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. hadcation -- education. >> and fashion build. what role you play in one of the world's most polluted places. we take you inside of hell on earth. >> if you want to see what hell looks like. you come to the tannery and have a look at the tannery that should tell you how the hell looks like. ♪ >> good evening and thank you thanks for being with us. i'm joie chen. >> it was not much of a surprise detroit's financial concerns are well known and it produced every indication that something dramatic had to be done. >> as the city manager pointed out today now it's real bankruptcy court judge ruled that the city's chapter 9 filing can go forward and critically the pension of city workers are not protected. the detroit leaders now face new pressures in working out a deal. but the real weight may be on the ordinary people that have to live with it. >> spinning it as a opportunity for a fresh start. the man behind detroit's bid for bankruptcy emergency manager kevin orr says it offers a clean slate for the city ac's model of urban decay. >> the city can go forward and pay it's bills as they come due
children. i'm focusing on taking care of them and making them happy and make sure they get the education so they don't have to work a fast food ra.t restaurant at 9 . >> for the past three weeks i have been working nights and weekends because christmastime is coming up. >> one day she plans to return to college and ultimately changing careers. a bump in pay would help make that happen. >> the vatican is starting a new program to fight sexual abecause in the catholic church. pope francis is putting together a committee for a way to protect children from pedophiles and improve screening from proo pris and help those that have been abused. >> they ar dealing with the sexual abuse crisis is vital for the church's credibility. >> twenty-five soldiers were killed in a suicide attack at the yemen defense three. a car bomb wait went off. shortly after the bombing gunmen opened fire. no one has claimed responsibility. the interim government has had ongoing problems with al qaeda linked groups and northern rebels. >> secretary of state john kerry is meeting with the palestinian officials hoo today.
firm belief that education held the key to helping south africans. tÑ >> well back to al jazeera america. i'm del walters. here are today's headlines. lawmakers are due back in washington. they'll be facing pressing matters before they head out for the holidays. the most significant issue is the budget to avoid the government shutdown like the one in october. >>> four leaders are making their way to pay tribute to nelson mandela. president obama and first lady are taking off on air force one. >>> french forces are now the central africa republic say they will restore order by answer means necessary. the. >>> 37 years after students in soweto protests over the education system, south african students still fail to make the grade. it seems that apartheid is still hard to overcome. we have more from cape town. [ cheering ] nelson mandela supporting and encouraging children in school. from the start of his career as an ain't apartheid activist, the leader placed education at the center of the struggle. he said his single most important priority is >> later because of this and in some
forces last month. bernard smith has more from cairo. >> former center of islamic education in egypt has been one of the focal points for people, students protesting the coup that deposed mohamed morsi back in september. there's fighting still ongoing despite the arrests, between students and security forces all day. in fact it seems to have stepped up over the past few days, protests pretty much all the time but yesterday we had a group of women students just outside the university beaten up by local residents and by security forces, we are told. earlier last month we had 21 students facing trial for previous protests at al assad university and we have another 12 students who have been jailed for 17 years for protesting again at that same university. so a considerable crack down by the security forces against the students and at al assad university and they are continuing to protest and they seem to be gathering in intensity. >> thailand will hold its parliamentary plekses o election january 2nd, after yin luck shinawatra has, run the country. wayne hay reports from bangkok. >> the lead
we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> here are the headlines at this hour. >> only on al jazeera america. determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exis
to take a part that have memorial. of course, mandela believed education was the foundation for a new south africa. but 37 years protesting in soweto, apartheid is proving hard to overcome. [ cheering ] >> nelson mandela supporting and encouraging children in school. from the start of his career as an anti-apartheid activist, he placed education is the the center of the struggle. his single priority was develop the nation's education. in 197, the soweto up rising began over being forced to learn afrikaans, the language of the oppressors. noone of the students who rioted now is principal of the school. >> wlater because of they were trying to educate us and we begin to understand why the situation, why the up rising. >> reporter: here the students learn as nelson mandela, to educate black students to the level of their white counter parts, to give them purpose. >> they have struggled to fulfill mandela's vision. schools outside cape town are more typical of the problems that the system is struggling with. activists argue there is now a dangerous gap between the promise of education and
education... gun control... the gap between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax policy... the economy... iran... healthcare... ad guests on all sides of the debate. >> this is a right we should all have... >> it's just the way it is... >> there's something seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america power of the people until we restore >> evey sunday night, join us for exclusive, revealing, and suprizing talks with the most interesting people of our time. next sunday, >> i spent my whole life thinking about themes and thinking about how to structure movies, so this is highly unusual. >> the director of the sixth sense, says there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan next sunday at 7et / 4pt
with one issue education... gun control... the gap between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax policy... the economy... iran... healthcare... ad guests on all sides of the debate. >> this is a right we should all have... >> it's just the way it is... >> there's something seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america >> welcome back. we're talking about erasing your digital past. california just passed a law allowing kids under 18 to hit the delete button. so waj, we asked our community what they would like to deligh delete. >> our community is very suspicious. mime skeletons are hopefully buried deep. no reason to unearth them now. digital, i'm worried about the photos hiding in my trunks, albums in the mid 80s. kids these days don't "v" no ideas what photo albums are. and we got one answer p my "star trek" one -win loss
dig in those numbers those people who have higher education despite the cost and debt they incur, they do much better. >> that's correct. even in this recession, their unemployment rate stayed half that of high school graduates. but what happened in this report was that over the last three months you do look, and you get a good result that college graduates with a bachelor's degree or more, they did much better over the last three months suggesting we may be seeing some acceleration, some improvement. >> as you go left. on the right you have some college. on the left, high school dropouts have the highest unemployment rate. >> that's right. your rung on the ladder depends on your skills, age, race, ethnicity, where you live, and high school drop outs in this information-based economy, they're the least skilled. what jumped out at me when i looked at this, yeah, compared to last month the college grads did much better. >> but they have half of the unemployment rate of the national average 3.4% compared to 7%. >> that's been a longstanding that college grads have. but you see the y
two businesses, something he probably wouldn't have done if he got another concussion. he educates families about the risk of playing football. >> football is a game. if i could talk to every kid putting on their helmet, "this is a game. this is life. this is life. this is what i experience because i stepped away from football." >> sure. >> imagine if i didn't - why would i sacrifices my life for a game. >> i don't think there's going be a concussion helmet. you can think of this like a car crash. if you were the brain and the car is your skull. doesn't matter if the car is indesinstructible you, the brain, will still fly forward and hit the windshield. that's the concussion - the brain hitting the skull. differently. >> it can be applied to soldiers, i am sure a lot of them get hits as well. >> the labs i went to were working with darpa, the department of defense, because when you undergo a grenade blast or something like that there's a shock wave that moves your brain like an nfl hit would. >> you went upstate new york and covered a story that was different. what was it. >> i wen
there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america >> this is "inside story." i'm ray suarez. we have rick seany with fair compare compare, and douglas kidd, and terry trip letter, an aviation analyst who runs a consumer website called "the plane rules." you heard terry trip letter laying out the ways that this could be good for all the stake hold efforts involved, but we have lived through an era of mega mergers. have they done any of the things that terry suggests? >> i'm not sure that they have. the primary benefit that all these mergers have provided is that they've kept carriers in business while they have consolidated. while the carriers are in business, we want them to make money and provide good service there has been to my mind especially among the u.s. carriers a focus more on making money rather than pleasing the passenger . in this with regard we know going to the airport is like going to a carnival where you pay your fe
. >> ...thought provoking >> get your damn education. >> ...surprising >> oh, absolutely! >> ...exclusive one-on-one interviews with the most interesting people of our time. >> you're listening because you want to see what's going to happen. >> i want to know what works what do you know works? >> conversations you won't find anywhere else. >> talk to al jazeera. >> only on al jazeera america. >> oh my! >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm stephanie sy here are today's headlines. the u.s. economy is growing, but so is the income gap between the rich and the poor. president obama will talk about how to change that and other aspects of the economy when he speaks at a washington think tank in just a few minutes. vice president joe biden is meeting with chinese leaders in beijing but they didn't make any public comments over a dispute over a small group of islands in the east chai sea. >>> a senior leader of hezbollah is gunned down outside of his home in beirut. and they a blaming israel. israel is denying the accusations. >>> cigna announced it will no longer hire people who test positive
to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan next sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america >>> you said that you would be happy to go to geneva peace talks if invited, the general eva peace talks would take place in january. what kind of assistance can you bring for iran? can you force, for example, the regime into medication concessio concessions? we can only bring home the fact that there current be a military solution in syria. there needs to be a political solution and the ultimate solution is through the ballot box for the syrian people to decide under appropriate circumstances. so what we can do, if invited, is to help even if you are not invited. we have sirius interests in having stability in our region. and that is why invited or not, we will contribute to finding a peaceful revolution of this unfortunate crisis. >> to be invited, you have to overcome a major obstacle to convince the syrian opposition that you are a genuine mediator because for the time being, iran has been provid
they do. >> in some of the tweets waj was reading do you think there should be mandatory education for kids so she really understand what they're getting in to when they're online? >> i actually think that's a great idea. some people are initiated in the ways of the web. it would be great to have some guidelines and a few stops to look to chart it. i'm not convinced that people will look at kids being dumb online and see it as so different from kids being dumb off line. maybe as the internet penetrates our lives more and more, we'll have a sense of that's what kids do, and that's fine. >> meg, how does this compare to some of the legislation that is proposed in the e.u. right now? >> the update to the data protection regulation or the data protection directive '95 includes a right to be forgotten regardless of age. they talked about the data controller being obligated by the data subject upon request to delete information that identifies the data subject. the way it is written it is not restricted to things that you post, that you can take down. it reaches information that is about
journalism, period. >> start with one issue education... gun control... the gap between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax policy... the economy... iran... healthcare... ad guests on all sides of the debate. >> this is a right we should all have... >> it's just the way it is... >> there's something seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america >> and welcome back. tonight we're looking in depth at health care in privately run prisons in america and in the second part of his investigation, america tonight's adam may, said that in an effort to save money, privatized care has sentenced some prisoners to death. >> it's a growing trend, states looking to trim budgets. to date, at least 28 states have privatized prison care. american friend services, in arizona, since the time the state privatized the prison health care , cost d
mandela and it will be tomorrow at f and b stadium in johannesburg and a belief that education was the only way for people to raise up from poverty and where that legacy stands today. and revolutionary cancer treatment and using one deadly disease to battle another. >> i'm mark and coming up, the afc race is heating up as manning is a leg up on the competition, that is ahead in sports. >>> wintry conditions will improve today but i'm tracking another round of snow for the northeast, i'll have details coming up. >>> al jazeera america continues and thomas and i are back with you in just 2 1/2 minutes. ♪ straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be a
stunty for countries through development aid, on fostering education for boys and girls and training and conducting leadership and political capacity training in countries so they can select their own stronger governments. we support regional organizations, the u.s. has been active in asean, an asian regional organization which has increasing number of countries. we have a trade policies, major trading agreements with asia and europe. my dream is that one day soon the middle east will not only recognise israel's right to exist and the palestine state, but will be an economic powerhouse. there's enormous natural and intellectual resources in the middle east. wouldn't it be great if the middle east could trade with europe, asia, latin america, africa and the united states on a fair basis, and everybody could win. >> thoughtful comments. jane harman. appreciate you joining us on "consider this". for more on the middle east and contentious article if women and men can have it all. i'm joined by anne-marie slaughter, former member of the state department, but now a member of the new ameri
's fun to play with ideas. >> ...thought provoking >> get your damn education. >> ...surprising >> oh, absolutely! >> ...exclusive one-on-one interviews with the most interesting people of our time. >> you're listening because you want to see what's going to happen. >> i want to know what works what do you know works? >> conversations you won't find anywhere else. >> talk to al jazeera. >> only on al jazeera america. >> oh my! power of the people until we restore our free >> from debt to america to let's make a deal. jamar zarif has wrapped up a diplomatic charm offensive after wrapping up an interim deal on iran's nuclear program. zarif gave an exclusive interview to al jazeera english where he emphasized again that iran's nuclear program will go on at least partly on iran's terms. >> iran will continue its enrichment at 5%. and iran will continue construction work at iraq. >> for more here in new york is nadir sh ar mi at the joseph corevel at the university of denver. also, the co-of a new book, the syria dilemma. you heard zarif speaking. he insisted they don't want nuclear bombs.
's term. if he were not to doing this about spending and we were invest can in the future, in education, research, we are seeing american research going to china and we are not spending tax dollars on basic research, which corporations don't do. >> that's always been done by government. so, neither the finding about young people is surprising, nor is the president's focus. yeah, we have brought down the deficit is what he is saying, significantly, 90% of americans seem to be unaware of this. million americans receiving disability benefits. 47 million on food stamps? >> yeah. >> torn in 4 million on long-term, getting unemployment benefits. the president's initiatives call for more spending. we still have a very big deficit and a very big nut to pay to foreign countries. is more spending the way to go? >> we are not paying to other countries. >> that's a misunderstanding to what the deficit is about. the united states government kate never go broke so long as it is a cough ren with monopoly control of its currency. the reason we have people on disability, people work until they can't and
. >> the director of the sixth sense, says there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >> while you were asleep, news was happening. >> here are the stories we're following. >> find out what happen
the temporary frustrations of the affordable care roll out. >> a lot of it is education. they don't understand what it is and are afraid to go through the process. >> for andy peak the partial government shutdown created confusion and fear about the affordable care act. >> i didn't want to punch the bottom and sign up to pay $280-$300, adding it to my meagre month to month income. >> as the dust settles counselling from the music heath alliance allowed him to take a look and sign up. he'll pay around $150 a month. and for a career musician, that could allow him to pursue his passion of performing for the rest of his life. >>> the administration says healthcare.gov is functional for 80% of users. >>> let's get a look at the morning business headlines. european and u.s. banks are expected to be hit with a fine for manipulating key interest rates. reuters says six bangs will be fined more than $2 million. they rigged bench marks determining the cost of lending from mortgages the banks involved. more regulations will be invoked. banks would be banned from doing anything for their own game. the new
that poverty because she lacks a dicent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own, that should affect all of us. >> it should compel us to action. we are a better country. let me repeat. the combined trends of inceffed inequality pose a fundamental effect. >> republicans were quick to cit size of president's remarks. the income gap is caused by policies claiming that the affordable care act and tougher business regulations encourage company depends on the government. the statistics are telling. from 2009 to 2012 the average engine from the top 1% of earners increased 31%. incomes for the rest of the nation's workers rose by one half of one%. >> thousands of fast-food workers scheduled to last their ship are striking. in 100 cities they are striking, demanding pay. today's strikes are the latest move in a campaign that started last summer. the medium wage is slightly more than $900. >> the workers live in poverty, working in conditions. >> more than two and a quarter americans have non-management jobs with the top 10 fast food chains. anti-government fo
monday. dominoes brought up an idea over the summer but gave no education it wanted to deliver via drones. amazon, however, says its serious about its aspirations. this tech writer believes them. >> amazon doesn't do things in small ways. if they are going to deploy this, they want to do it on a wide scale. so presuming technology advances as it has at am zon and the f.a.a. gets its act together, i don't see how this doesn't become very large in about five years. >> here is how it would work. an order is boxed in a nearby warehouse, attached to the drone and off it goes to the delivery address. the device currently allows up to 5 pounds of weight. just one of the technical issues that would have to be addressed according to this law in rob on theics expert? >> how do we make them safe and make sure they are not going to fall out of the sky and run into something? provided those get ironed out, privacy concerns will crop up. >> it should have a privacy plan that's really rigorous. in other words, that you have to articulate to the federal aviation administration, how it intends to did be w
. we are putting billions of dollars into a program which will bring to them education, which will bring to them health, electricity and running water and sewage and all of the other basic amenities which you and i expect of the -- of our authorities to give us. >> tpolicy of moving the bedoui won't become law until the kin he isset passes it. the bedouin says they are determined to stay. israel is unlikely to change their position. there is much more ahead on al jazeera america, including fighting childhood obesity. a new way to get children to lose those extra pounds. >>> being healthy can be fun. >> that's what one doctor is trying to teach kids. morgan radford explains. >> i am not your average doc. exercise is. >> he is known as the hip-hop doc, teaching kids how to eat healthier and he is doing it to a beat. >> a neurologist. >> doctor williams flings born in nigeria. when he came do new york city, he saw the need for a community based approach to healthcare. >> we focus many more resources on healing, on fixing problems than preventing them from starting >> reporter: so
of the sixth sense, says there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america >> anest natean estimated 131 mn americans have gone online and spent big bucks. sales could top $2 billion. that would be a cyberrecord and 20% more than a year ago. online growth has been bigger than growth at bricks and mortar stores. and david strawser said it's been an especially hard year for retailers. >> the low-and middle-class has been tough this year. the housing sector has done well. home depot and lowes has done well. the rest of retail has really struggled. >> joining us is stephanie humphrey tech lifestyle writer for" efor eboni.com. welcome. >> thank you for having me. >> so how does this change over time? >> i don't think it's going to happen any time soon, either. i think what you're going to see is more of that technology integration kind of into the overall shopping experience. >> can bricks and mortar stores do anything to turn the tren
do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america >> and welcome back. tonight we're looking in depth at health care in privately run prisons in america and in the second part of his investigation, america tonight's adam may, said that in an effort to save money, privatized care has sentenced some prisoners to death. >> it's a growing trend, states looking to trim budgets. to date, at least 28 states have privatized prison care. american friend services, in arizona, since the time the state privatized the prison health care, cost dropped $30 million. 50 people died in arizona department of corrections custody in just the first eight months of this year. compare this to 37 deaths in the previous two years combined. >> some people just believe the government is the only one to care for this people. >> state attorney general john cavanaugh, we asked him whether he thought it put inmates in danger. >> people die in prisons. i receive a lot of hand
>> get your damn education. >> ...surprising >> oh, absolutely! >> ...exclusive one-on-one interviews with the most interesting people of our time. >> you're listening because you want to see what's going to happen. >> i want to know what works what do you know works? >> conversations you won't find anywhere else. >> talk to al jazeera. >> only on al jazeera america. >> oh my! >> the vilification, targeting of immigrants in the u.s. isn't anything new. but since the mi the mid 90s, after the oklahoma city bombings in 1995, congress passed laws expanding the grounds for the detention and deportation of noncitizens. for national security reasons and set up a registry for those from predominantl predominantlym countries. in 2003, the bush administration created ice, under the newly formed department of homeland security, its ten year goal was to deport every single deportable noncitizen in the country. two years later the bush administration expanded the detention of criminal prosecution of undocumented people crossing the border. >> undocumented individuals to enter our country represen
every morning, every day, 5am to 9 eastern with al jazeera america. >> start with one issue education... gun control... the gap between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax policy... the economy... iran... healthcare... ad guests on all sides of the debate. >> this is a right we should all have... >> it's just the way it is... >> there's something seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america >> welcome back. we're talking about the pope francis effect and how the new pope is making waves and the globe, how do you not when you marriage. there is a lot of talk about what about pope's position is if these topics so we're going to try to clarify. father john what are the positions that the pope has issues? >> first of all he has talked about all these issues and by the way he is not backing away from the traditional teac
. >> start with one issue education... gun control... the gap between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax policy... the economy... iran... healthcare... ad guests on all sides of the debate. >> this is a right we should all have... >> it's just the way it is... >> there's something seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america >>> welcome back. the city of detroit is the now officially bankrupt. the questions on the mind of many city workers is what will happen to our pensions. it's not clear just yet. it's on the lips of many others who live in struggling municipalities around the country. already lessons to be learned from cities and towns and countries who have received pensions. it could offer clues. for example, rhode island, a community close to emerging from bankruptcy now but cut 25% of worker pensions. 20%
healthcare and education, modernizing the country's infrastructure, and pushing for racial healing. while his close relationships with foreign leaders like mom mad gaddafi and fidel castro drew criticism, he still visited the white house a number of times. in 2002, joshing w bush presented him with the presidential medal of freedom. barack obama met mandela only once, in 2005, when obama was still a senator. after just one term as president, mandela stepped down. but he did not slow his pace. his charitable foundation raised money for a variety of causes. he made his last major public appearance, the crowd honoring him with a thunderous ovation. the former first lady was at his side through his battles with prostate cancer that hospitalized him near the end. never, and never again, shall it be that experience, the oppressive of one for another. in fact, shall never effect on so glorious a human achievement. thank you. >> nelson mandela. the new south africa, dead at 95. we are about 50 teen minutes away from america tonight to continue our coverage, tell us what is coming up. >> yeah, john, i
with me at this time fond memories of systematic education, patient, calculated, measured, to ensure that we begin to appreciate that struggle is not just about emotional drive, but that we need it to learn the tactics that would make us [ inaudible ] to fight us, and enable us to survive through thick and thin. >> reporter: on the streets where he lived during apartheid people gathered too. this was a hot bed of -- [ technical difficulties ] >> he is a hero to all around the world. everyone is very sad right now because he is gone. >> reporter: many people here say they will celebrate his life. millions of south africans won't be able to attend the state funeral, but they plan to say farewell in their own way. they say they are going to line the streets all across south africa and say farewell to the father of the nation and thank you for making south africa what it is today. nelson mandela inspired millions of people to reconcile and forgive. they begin to prepare to say good-bye. >>> the death of nelson mandela is also hitting home. communities across the u.s. are paying tribute
if he got another have done if he got another concussion. concussion. he educates families about the he educates families about the risk of playing football. risk of playing football. >> football is a game. >> football is a game. if i could talk to if i could talk to every kid every kid putting on their helmet, "this putting on their helmet, "this is a game. is a game. this is life. this is life. this is life. this is life. this is what i experience this is what i experience because i stepped away from because i stepped away from football." football." >> sure. >> sure. >> imagine if i didn't - why >> imagine if i didn't - why would i sacrifices my would i sacrifices my life for a life for a game. game. >> i don't think there's going >> i don't think there's going be a concussion helmet. be a concussion helmet. you can think of this like a car you can think of this like a car crash. crash. if you were the brain and the if you were the brain and the car is your skull. car is your skull. doesn't matter if the car is doesn't matter if the car is indesinstructible you, the indesinstructible
to be a teacher? >> it's an awesome feeling to have brought up children in the multi-racial education society and they have proved that they can make it out there? >> did you have that opportunity? >> no. >> the family is raising a black child and their community, while not fully integrated is more diverse. >> it's not only blacks, only whites. eyes are open. >> today was a national day of prayer and reconciliation anna katrada new man dela for years, including two decades in prison. >> with freedom comes responsibility. freedom did not fall from heaven. >> today, they did say good buy and thanked the man who gave their children the diverse future they never had. >> as perussia put it to me today she was thanking mandel a for creating a special currents tree for her children do -- country for her children to grow up in. >> new mexico new mexico visited l.a. in 1990 after his release from prison. it's a visit that still r resonates with many today. brian rooney has more >> reporter: they remembered new mexico new mexico all day here at the first ame church in los angeles. they say they have f
on twitter and at aljazeera.com. >> start with one issue education... gun control... the gap between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax policy... the economy... iran... healthcare... ad guests on all sides of the debate. >> this is a right we should all have... >> it's just the way it is... >> there's something seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america >> this isn't a new channel, this is a watershed moment in media for america. >> this entire region is utterly devastated. >> people our here are struggling. >> the fire jumped the highway we took earlier. >> your average viewer want's to actually understand how the health care law is going to help them or hurt them. >> they know they can get extremist bickering somewhere else. >> people say that we're revolutionary. our revolution is just going back to doing the best
that today or tomorrow. the operator did survive. he was injured. educated that he tried to apply the brakes, that the train was coming into the curve quickly and he tried to apply the brakes. they want to see what that operator has to say. the speed in that part of the rail should have been 30 miles an hour. the train would have needed to slow from 70-mile an hour on the straight away to that 30 miles an hour. did that happen? investigators will be back on the rails today to try to look at the rails and the crumbled cars themselves to see what they can learn from that. >> ok. lisa stark reporting to us from washington. thank you. >> metro north has been working to prevent accidents. we have a look at some prior accidents in the mta history. >> it carries more than 82 million people a year, which is the busiest in the country. it's part of new york's metropolitan transportation authority. it is a system of subways, buses and commuters trains. the deadliest crash was in 1918 when a subway driver lost control in brooklyn. the last time passengers were killed in an m.t. the a. crash was 1991 wh
is educating the consumer about how healthcare works, how health insurance works, and how the tax credits work. because that's what makes somebody a knowledgeable consumer. that's what we want. that's what we need when people come on down site. >> that depends on advertising, promotions and getting people to go to the site in the first place. are the numbers on the connecticut site what you thought would be? >> they are, but what is past is past. we did fine the last couple of months, but we're looking for december to get us up over 60,000 members if we can. because at the end of the year, before the january 1st time frame. so yeah, what's past is hopefu hopefully prologued for us. but december is going to be very busy. >> what is the information that consumers should have on hand when they go to the connecticut website and where do consumers run into trouble with just their own information? >> gee, that's a great question. understanding about your family make up, when i say that, social security numbers, birth dates. going back and understanding what you made in the last couple of years so yo
. >> you're listening because you want to see whats going to happen. >> get your damn education. >> talk to al jazeera. only on al jazeera america. >> oh my! >> welcome back. here at the morseem, the work of journalists is chronicled and honored in a number you have visits including one which is a tribute to journalists who have fallen while pursuing their stories. one whose short life has inspired creative work, dan eldon who was raised in kenya. he was all of that, brave and bold and lost in a gruesome assault 20 years ago. then he was just 22. and then, eldon was a photo journalist documenting somalia as things spun out of control. on july 12th, 1993, filing a violent assault, protesters in the streets turned on dan and three colleagues working there. they were beaten and stoned to death. in the two deck it's a since that day, dan's mother, cathy, and his sister, set out to preserve the legacy of his brief but quite extraordinary life. it has inspired a number of other documentarians as adam may found when he sat down to speak with dan's mother. >> tell me about dan's work. what was i
and use different technology for specific purpos purposes. some educators warn that nurseries are falling into the trap of displacing traditional learning and play activities with high tech alternatives. the challenge for daycare centers now is trying to combine both. making children as comfortable with the mouse as they are with the pencil. >> rescue operation under way to reach migrants trapped on a fi fishing boat off the coast of southern italy. the shows the ship struggling in gale force winds. >>> a fire running through a garment factory killing seven people. it happened in a loft where workers were sleeping in a dorm tore. many people work in unsafe continues. the wreckage of a police helicopter which crashed into a crowded glasgow pub in scotland is being removed. investigators say the pilot did not make any emergency calls before the crash. nine people were killed, but there could be more bodies buried inside the building. >>> french police say they've broken up a huge arm smuggling ring. let's get more from jackie who has been following the story. jackie, it sounds like it was q
's name means western education is forbidden. it sames to throw -- overthrow the government and to -- establish an islamic estate. one of their worst attacks came two years ago when a series of bombs targeted churches on christmas day. >>> hakeem josef is in scotland and says that the attack shows that the nigerian security forces are ineffective. >> there are the police, there is the security services. we have more than four security agencies in in nigeria. it is then extremely strange that a couple of -- hundreds of people could launch an early-morning attack in such a situation. it shows that the activities of the government is not being lead by intelligence, which is very key in situations of insecurity as [ inaudible ] by the boca haram crisis. what has been happening is when there is an attack by boca haram the government launches a counterattack usually on the civilian population. amnesty international highlighted this. nigeria's body for security in the -- during the military era, until -- even more so continuing during a civil democratic regime ostensibly has only g
and adam lanza had killed himself after takings lives of 20 children and six educators. >> we're not playing the calls and for obvious reasons, but i'm still curious as to the tone of the calls you listened to. >> reporter: some of them were calm. the custodian was a little bit concerned, obviously, but i couldn't call him to be in a state of emotional distress. the teacher in her room was unusually calm. she had not been able to lock the door. the police asked her if she do the safety, she said she couldn't. she was told to just keep every quiet and take care of the children, take care of herself. there were spouse who is had received text messages from their loved one inside the building. all in all you would have to call the response, especially on the part of the dispatcher, but those making the calls cool and calm. >> hard to react when you're panicked. calm make sense. randall. thank you. the u.s. economy is growing, but so is the income gap between rich and poor americans. president obama addressed the problem. >> the lack of upward mobility that has jeopardized middle
, i'm focusing on taking care of them, making them happy, and make sure they get the education so that they don't have to work a fast food restaurant at $9.31. >> the university of pittsburgh is held up as a model of recovering from a decline, striking the right mix of development to allow to weather the cycle of boom and bust that has devastated other cities. we investigate. >> so much of eric's life sounds like a fantasy. an old industrial slag heap is in a city -- there's a culture, there's reasons for smart people to come -- >> i cannot recall ever saying that he wants to be someplace else. in his terms, what do we need to do to make us better, that fits our needs. >> and it is leadier in health care and technology. pittsburgh does tunes the huge wealth -- >> thank you very much. three wickets, could have been better in the final session of three. after some ill tempered exchanges in the first half, no less competitive this i'mout. >> we still hate each other's guts. [ laughter ] >> i told michael clarke i'd rip his ears off. this is also going to be a bit of a niggle. >> a lo
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